'I was in 40+ different placements throughout my time in foster care'


    "I was in 40 plus different placements throughout my time in foster care and often times I would only get to take maybe a duffel bag or a garbage bag worth of items of my own," Schuyler Davis said. (Submitted photo)

    EUGENE, Ore. - Acorn Park is a special place for Schuyler Davis.

    "I feel a sense of happiness when I come here," he said.

    It's where his mom used to take him as a child until he was 7.

    That's when he says the death of his father and mental health issues weighed down on his family.

    He ended up in foster care.

    "I was in 40 plus different placements throughout my time in foster care and often times I would only get to take maybe a duffel bag or a garbage bag worth of items of my own," Davis said.

    Moving around caused him to fall behind in school, he said.

    And he dealt with depression, anger and issues with the law as a teenager.

    He was heading towards a path that statistically many other foster kids follow.

    But Davis had other plans.

    "You can choose to accept what happened to you sucks and move forward and be the best person you can be," he said, "or you can let it dominate your life and ultimately fail."

    He got his GED and shortly after started Project Foster Kids USA in 2014.

    It started with a Facebook page: Davis would set up events where people could donate items like clothes, toys, food and toiletries for foster kids.

    "I wanted to replenish said items so kids could still feel like they had a normal childhood," he said.

    The items are distributed by organizations like Trillium Family Services.

    "It's usual during the holiday season, which is critical for families," said Kim Scott, Trillium's CEO.

    Scott has seen Davis go from a client at Trillium to a partner.

    "I just see Schuyler as this huge success story," Scott said, "and I'm so proud of everything he does."

    The project now serves Lane and Multnomah counties and holds three annual donation drives.

    Schuyler is working to make the project an official non-profit, expanding services to life skills classes and court advocates for foster kids.

    Along the way, he has reunited with his biological mom, who now gets to see his success.

    "We've gotten the help we needed," he said, "and we're moving on to bigger and better things."

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