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'President Trump has to be held accountable for what he says and what he does'

"He's just brought it back to the surface what was already deep into the DNA of this country," said Nina Turner, keynote speaker at the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Lane Community College. "While President Trump has to be held accountable for what he says and what he does, as a nation we have to do the real soul searching and do the real work that is necessary."

EUGENE, Ore. - President Trump denied using a vulgar term to describe Haiti, El Salvador and various African nations during a discussion about immigration policy.

"I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," the president proclaimed.

The bigger issue for Nina Turner is racism in America, in all its forms.

"He's just brought it back to the surface what was already deep into the DNA of this country," said Turner, keynote speaker at the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Lane Community College. "While President Trump has to be held accountable for what he says and what he does, as a nation we have to do the real soul searching and do the real work that is necessary."

The event will be held Wednesday, January 17 starting at 5:30 p.m. at the Lane Community College Center for Meeting and Learning, Building 19, 4000 E. 30th Ave., Eugene.

Turner is the president of Our Revolution, a political organization founded by Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont to support his agenda.

Turner said doing that "real work" is the centerpiece of her talk at the LCC celebration, along with reflecting on what's happened since the death of the civil rights icon.

Turner said the 50th anniversary this year of the assassination of Dr. King is weighing heavily on her mind.

"He would have been 89 year old this year had he lived, and really it's about the reflection and a deep analysis of what the legacy and life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, means," she said.

Turner, a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, said change will only come when society truly comes to grips with poverty and education.

"Education certainly is the greatest investment that we can make towards eradicating, generational poverty in this country," she said.

It's change that Turner says won't happen overnight - but is made possible by the example of Dr. King.

"The struggle continues," she said, "but at least because of the life he lived, we have a roadmap of what it takes to really bring people together from all walks of life."

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